FNPS Promotes

the Preservation, Conservation, and Restoration of the Native Plants and Native Plant Communities of Florida.

We provide scientifically sound information on native plants, their habitats, the wildlife that depends on them, and their management and culture

Photographs by Catherine Bowman

News


Conference 2017 Photographs

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Posted May 22, 2017

If you have photographs of the conference and field trips that you would like to share, we want them! Please send an email to the Web Team (webteam@fnps.org) and let us know how many you have.  We will either have you email them to one of us or we will ask you to upload them to our Flickr site.…

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Wednesday's Wildflower: Eastern Bluestar

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Posted May 10, 2017
EASTERN BLUESTAR Amsonia tabernaemontana 
Submitted by Roger Hammer 
This perennial wildflower reaches 3' tall with smooth stems and lanceolate to elliptic leaves from 3–4" long and ¾"­–1" wide (the uppermost leaves are sessile). It can form large, multi-stemmed clumps and is easy to see when in flower. Pale blue, ¾", star-shaped flowers are in terminal clusters. Flowering season begins in March and lasts into August...
 

Learn About Land Management Reviews

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Posted April 28, 2017
Learn About Land Management Reviews 
The schedule for the 2017/2018 Land Management Reviews is out. Being a part of Land Management Reviews is is an important part of the Florida Native Plant Society mission to promote the preservation, conservation, and restoration of the native plants and native plant communities of Florida. It is also a very rewarding experience for anyone who has participated in one.

AT the Florida Native Plant Society's 37th Annual Conference in May there will be a special field trip where you can Learn About Land Management Reviews. The site for the Thursday morning training will be Lake Kissimmee State Park. Led by Eugene Kelly and Eric Egensteiner (Park Biologist), this trip is designed to serve as a case study for the state’s Land Management Review process.
 

FNPS Named Conservation Org of Year by Fl Wildlife Fed

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Posted May 02, 2017

On April 21st, FNPS President Catherine Bowman, Past President Anne Cox, Board Members Ron Blair and Winnie Said (along with her husband Brian), and Development Director Andy Taylor accepted the Conservation Organization of the Year award from the Florida Wildlife Federation. The award was presented…

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Fox 13 Features Consumer Alert For Native Milkweed

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Posted March 21, 2017

Fox 13 in Tthe Tampa Bay area recently featured a Consumer Alert informing people to make sure they buy the correct, native milkweed to help support monarchs.  FNPS members Scott Davis, Louie Castillo and Bruce Turley of Wilcox Nursery are interviewed. Want to learn more about monarchs and native…

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Jim Bierly

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Posted April 06, 2017

FNPS members mourn the death of Jim Bierly on April 6. Jim Bierly started the Citrus Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society in 2001 and served as the chapter’s representative to the FNPS board for many years.  Gail Taylor Citrus Chapter President will share details of the memorial service. …

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Latest from the Blog


EASTERN BLUESTAR
Amsonia tabernaemontana Walter
Dogbane Family (Apocynaceae)

Submitted by Roger Hammer


Eastern Bluestar, Rover Hammer, roadside ditch along SR65 near Apalachicola.


This perennial wildflower reaches 3' tall with smooth stems and lanceolate to elliptic leaves from 3–4" long and ¾"­–1" wide (the uppermost leaves are sessile). It can form large, multi-stemmed clumps and is easy to see when in flower. Pale blue, ¾", star-shaped flowers are in terminal clusters. Flowering season begins in March and lasts into August so look for it in the floodplain forests of the Florida panhandle east to Columbia, Alachua, and Levy Counties. It ranges across the eastern United States to Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas, and is on its southern range extension in Florida.

Amsonia commemorates English physician John Amson (1698–1763) who moved to Virginia and was mayor of Williamsburg from 1750–1751. The name tabernaemontana honors Jacob Theodor von Bergzabern (1520–1590), who changed his name to Jakobus Theodorus Tabernaemontanus (literally “tavern in the mountains”). This species is sometimes cultivated and excels when planted in moist, loamy soils in sunny or partly shaded locations. Fringed bluestar (Amsonia ciliata) has short-petiolate upper leaves.


Seeds germinate quickly and will flower the second year. 

Roger is a member of the FNPS Dade Chapter and is currently working on a new Falcon Guide titled Complete Guide to Florida Wildflowers, due to be released in Spring 2018. His other wildflower guides include Florida Keys Wildflowers (2004), Everglades Wildflowers (2nd edition, 2014), and Central Florida Wildflowers (2016).
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Other links: 
USF Plant Atlas: Amsonia tabernaemontana
FNPS, Plants for your Area: Eastern Bluestar
Native Florida Wildflowers: Eastern Bluestar

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Conference Field Trip Highlight: Camp Lonesome Conservation Area
Wednesday's Wildflower Whitemouth Dayflower
Wednesday's Wildflower: Fewflower Milkweed
Learn About Land Management Reviews
Wednesday's Wildflower:Spanish Needle
Wednesday's Wildflower: Scrub Lupine
Conservation on a Working Ranch : Adams Ranch
Wednesday's Wildflower: Common Blue Violet
Wednesday's Wildflower: Common Torchwood